Archived Blogs

President & CEO John Hyatt's powerful pledge to the community
By: John Hyatt, President & CEO
The Struggle is Real
By: John Hyatt, President & CEO
John Hyatt named IMPACT President & CEO
By: Vickie Boneck, Director of Marketing and Communications
Thank you for everything
by Michael G. Davis, President and CEO Posted: December 1, 2015
IMPACT 2-1-1 among largest 2-1-1 providers
by Vickie Boneck, Director of Marketing & Communications Posted: March 30, 2015
‘Tis the Season
by Vickie Boneck, Director of Marketing & Communications Posted: December 22, 2014.
New housing for families in Milwaukee County who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless
by Wyatt Massey, IMPACT Marketing & Communications Intern. Posted: May 28, 2014.
IMPACT 2-1-1 Information and Referral Service Expands to Nine Counties
by Vickie Boneck, Director of Marketing & Communications. Posted: February 11, 2014.
Pocket Change
Michael G. Davis, President & CEO, IMPACT. Posted: December 19, 2013.
LEADING INDICATORS. LEADING CHANGE.
By Michael Davis, President & CEO. Posted: June 13, 2013.
We’re in the big leagues now
By Michael Davis, President & CEO. Posted: April 29, 2013.
2-1-1s Bolstering Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts
by Vickie Boneck, Director of Marketing & Communications. Posted: November 12, 2012.
IMPACT 2-1-1 and Hunger Task Force Team up to Feed Kids This Summer
by Vickie Boneck, Director of Marketing & Communications Posted: June 6, 2012
Off the Streets & Out of Harm's Way
by Bob Waite, IMPACT 2-1-1 Program Director Posted: April 12, 2012
Looking Back. Moving Forward.
by Bob Waite, IMPACT 2-1-1 Program Director Posted: February 6, 2012

Volunteer/Intern at IMPACT

Volunteer/Intern image

If you enjoy being a part of a fast-paced and team-oriented environment; and are looking for a gratifying experience, this is the place for you.


Donate Now

Support IMPACT

2-1-1s Bolstering Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts

by Vickie Boneck, Director of Marketing & Communications

The Governors and State Offices of Emergency Management throughout the northeastern region of the United States are counting on 2-1-1 systems to aid in the immediate and long-term response to Hurricane Sandy. Residents are being encouraged to contact their local 2-1-1 for information about food, shelter and other basic needs; or how to access help from volunteers and other recovery services. The 2-1-1s are also helping to connect people with volunteer opportunities.

A 2-1-1’s primary function is to serve as an access point for those who need accurate information and clear direction. It becomes an essential component of emergency management after natural disasters because it serves as a critical communication link connecting government officials, agencies providing services, and callers in need. By the very nature of the 2-1-1 system, it can respond immediately during times of crisis; is structured to manage a high volume of calls; and the 2-1-1 staff is trained to provide critical and timely information.

In 2009, IMPACT 2-1-1 played a role in the H1N1 flu crisis when the Wisconsin Division of Public Health called on the 2-1-1 Wisconsin network to help direct callers to vaccination clinics, and to answer basic questions regarding the virus.

During the July 2010 flooding, IMPACT 2-1-1 collected property damage reports from residents on behalf of the Milwaukee County Emergency Management. As a result, thousands of people were eligible for compensation to aid them in recovery. It was also cost effective for government because it tapped into a system which was already in place.

Nationally, many local and state-wide 2-1-1s are operated by United Ways. A network of United Way organizations along the Eastern Seaboard have established the United Way Hurricane Sandy Recovery Fund to address near and long-term recovery needs of communities that FEMA has declared disaster areas in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Washington, DC and West Virginia. Visit UWSandyRecovery.org to donate to the Fund. You can also use your phone to text RECOVERY to 52000 to make a $10 donation.